Discussion of Mark Davis’ Handy Guide For Supporting Trump

Mark Davis posted “Your Handy Guide to Evaluating Trump Criticism.” It is a well written article and worthy of study and discussion.

Let me start with making an important distinction with Davis’ list.  He combines criticism from the right and from the left as equal.  This is not helpful.  So, I am going to rearrange the list into two groups – Criticisms of Trump from the Right, and Criticism of Trump from the left.

Criticism from the Right

  1. Trump is not a Consistent Conservative – True – But his anti immigration, vague plans for job creation, and his “hammering” political correctness “may” result in more “genuine” conservative victories than previous consistent conservatives.
  2. Not led a Biblical Life – Direct Hit – But for some reason it does not matter to his supporters.
  3. He is not really pro-life – True – And there is no reason to believe he is lying now about his pro-life positions.
  4. Cannot Count on his Court Picks –
  5. He Contributed to Dems – So What – He is a business man.
  6. He has no Core Values – Wrong –  he as a lot of core values
  7. He will not follow through on all the things he says – True – But he will be better than the sorry job the GOP Establishment has done

Criticism from Liberals

  1. Trump is a racist and a misogynist – Fails on its face.  – Not a “whiff” of mistreatment of women in his business history.
  2. Can Count on His Court Picks to be Racist White Nationalists –

Criticism from Both Sides

  1. He

 

Criticism from the Right

1.  Consistent Conservative

Davis Says:

“He is not a consistent conservative.” Completely correct. His populism certainly borrows from some strains of conservative thought, but his trade policies are of a more populist bent, and his willingness to entertain a higher minimum wage is straight-up liberalism.

Many conservatives who have long supported him know he does not bat a thousand, or even .800, but they feel his energy on immigration, job creation and hammering political correctness may result in more genuine conservative victories than, say, a Jeb Bush presidency might have yielded.

Ted Cruz made a big thing out of being a “Consistent Conservative.”

As a Liberal, whether Trump is a Consistent Conservative or not makes no difference in my view of him.

2. Not led a Biblical Life

Davis Says

“He seeks evangelical support, but has hardly led a Biblical life.” Direct hit. And to many, it appears not to matter one shred. Maybe it’s because every honest Christian who has traveled a redemptive path will tell you that God is not interested in your missteps, He is interested in your next steps.

Rehashing Trump’s multiple marriages and long-ago boasts (okay, most were long ago) are as irrelevant as a litany of any sinner’s past, as long as the current path seems solid. There is no evidence that he carries the stain of current violations of any major commandment, and while “Two Corinthians” may reveal a less than pastorly Bible literacy, many pastors back him.

Why? Because while the GOP field boasted many actual evangelicals with devout biographies, none seems to carry the potential to do what Christianity needs most urgently right now— blast through the suffocating political correctness that seeks to strangle our religious freedoms every day.

Again this is clearly a Conservative criticism.

From my perspective, Conservative Christians that take the approach Davis suggests, are total hypocrites. It demonstrates that they use selective perception, confirmation bias, and motivated reasoning to come to any conclusion they want.

There are countless facts that lead to the conclusion that the Christian Faith of a Candidate is a critical foundational driver for Christian voters.

3. Not Really Pro-Life

Davis writes:

“He is not a real pro-lifer.” Depends on the meaning of “real.” Does he have the moral clarity to assert that life in the womb is sacred, even in cases of rape and incest? He does not. Has he bought into the absurdity that Planned Parenthood does some good things? He has, meaning he cannot grasp that the organization would not exist but for abortion services. These are not good.

But there is no reason to believe that he is somehow lying in his testimony of becoming more pro-life as the years have passed. We conservatives are a funny lot; we persuade and coax and convince and lure people to our side, and when they pivot to agreement with us, we kick them in the crotch for not being with us their whole lives.

Davis say’s “there is no reason to believe that he is somehow lying in his testimony of becoming more pro-life as the years have passes.”  I find that belief amazing.  There is no reason to believe that Trump is saying anything at anytime that he believes.  He wants to President.

But, again more of a Right Wing concern.  I don’t consider any of the “Pro-Life” supporters to be really “Pro-Life.”  They are just forced childbirth once pregnant.  If they were really “Pro-life” they would be talking about reducing Infant Mortality.

Here is a very interesting post on this subject from the National Catholic Reporter – http://ncronline.org/blogs/distinctly-catholic/time-pro-life-movement-be-very-smart

Here is the key quote from the post:

A pro-life movement that ignores infant mortality rates, starvation, or the degradation of the environment simply does not deserve the label ‘pro-life.’ It becomes a mere euphemism for supporting laws that restrict access to abortion. It becomes detached from the understanding of human dignity and worth that should animate the movement. Only a whole life approach can make the pro-life movement authentically pro-life.

4.  Cannot Count on His Court Picks

Davis writes:

“We can’t count on his Supreme Court nominees.” What do people want him to do? He gave us a fat list of wonderful constitutionalist judges who would honorably fill the shoes of Antonin Scalia. Do we need a joint news conference with one of those names so that skeptics can know he means it? That is wildly inappropriate before he even accepts the nomination, and best left to the first days of his presidency, when he can make that announcement surrounded by the compelling imagery of the White House.

Trump’s tormentors responded to his worthy list with the same taunt they roll out with every conservative promise he makes: You can’t believe him, he’s a total liar. This is the mantra of those who don’t just doubt him; they hate him.

I find it interesting that Davis believes that Trump is wedded to anything he says.

Here are two examples of Trump saying every thing is negotiable.

5. He contributed to Democrats

Davis writes:

“He contributed to Democrats.” No kidding, as does every businessman who wants to curry favor across party lines. I daresay Trump would not open a checkbook for her these days, now that their relationship is political. This trope is trundled out by critics seeking to sow seeds of doubt as to Trump’s reliability on core values.

This actually goes along with #1 – Not a Consistent Conservative.

6.  No Core Values

“He doesn’t have any core values.” Have you listened to the man? Here are ten off the bat: stronger borders, blasting political correctness, leveling the trade playing field, rebuilding the military, taking better care of veterans, protecting gun rights, creating jobs, speaking truth to global jihad, and the broadly stated but resonant “make America great again.”

I sort of agree with Davis’ assessment here that Trump does have core values.  However, I would come up with a different list.  When Davis Says, Trump’s core value is Stronger Borders, I think Trump’s core value here is Xenophobia.  When Davis says, Trump’s core value is blasting political correctness, I think Trump’s core value is being able to insult everyone, but not tolerating any insults of him.

7. Will not follow through on all the things he says he will do

Davis writes:

Doubters may claim that he might not follow through on all ten [of his agenda items], but I’ll bet his batting average with those stated goals is better than the sorry job the Republican establishment has done following through on all of those things they said they would do if only we won the House, if only we won the Senate, if only, if only.

Davis does not know that Trump will follow through with any of his agenda items because Trump has no history of following through on any public policy agenda item.  One could argue that because he was “successful” in business he will be successful in getting his agenda though.  But, following through on public policy is a different universe than following though on a business agenda.

 

Criticism From the Left

1. Trump is a Fascist/Racist/misogynist

Davis Says:

“He doesn’t like Hispanics/ women/ fill in the blank.” The attempt to portray Trump as a racist or misogynist fails on its face. It is a slander leveled by people who know he is likely to fare better with Latinos in November than Mitt Romney did in 2012 (27 percent). I’d love to send this year’s entire seventeen-strong GOP field through the streets of South Brooklyn. Precisely one would get waves of appreciative welcome, and it’s not either of our candidates who were actual Hispanics.

As for women, any Republican faces a challenge in the current era of government as master nurturer. But strong, self-reliant women are pervasive among Trump supporters, and there is not a whiff of mistreatment of women in his business history. Quite the opposite, Trump World appears to be a complete meritocracy, where women and people of color are rewarded for performance without regard to race or gender. This is admittedly jarring in a country that has been led too long by Democrats obsessed with weaponizing both.

“He compliments Putin.” He sure does, in a certain oblique way, noting the Russian leader’s strength and devotion to his goals. For his part, Putin is eating it up, to the degree that he has thrown a compliment or two back Trump’s way.

2. He Rooted for People to lose their homes

Davis writes:

“He rooted for people to lose their homes in the recession’s housing collapse.” This is straight from the den of lies that is the Democrat party advertising brain trust.

They found audio of Trump in 2006, musing about how a drop in home prices could provide buying opportunities that could be of benefit to investors. The history of such logic dates to neanderthals hoping tiger pelts would dip in value to grease the wheels of commerce 30,000 years ago.

Yet Elizabeth Warren, who we learn has pocketed some cash from a house flip or two, lashed out against Trump’s cruelty for actively wishing for homeowners to lose everything. There are only two explanations for an attack this baseless: genuine stupidity and malicious intent. Let’s just say she is not stupid.

Here is some video on this.

Criticism from Both Side

1. He does unpresidential Things

“He does stunningly unpresidential things.” Yes, he does, and most of them have helped him win the nomination. To the chagrin of more mannerly tastes, his admittedly brash and aggressive style has been punctuated with moments of truly embarrassing excess.

Those moments have dwindled as he has sent his rivals home. His discipline should sharpen even further now that he has but one opponent to target, and those attacks on Hillary Clinton will delight rather than annoy millions of Republicans who have watched him flay their favored hopeful.

2. He changes his views on the fly

“He changes his views on the fly.” In general, this is not good. On important conservative economic points, if he has adopted one, he needs to stick to it. His reversal on a job-killing minimum wage increase was a total unforced error.

That said, he has stated often that he may adjust views as he becomes more familiar with various issues. While this annoys ideologues (like me), it may prove somewhat endearing to voters who sense he may listen as he learns the ropes of governance. And on things like reticence to commit U.S. troops to the Middle East, I am hoping he adjusts that view right after his first security briefing the afternoon of January 20, 2017.

But what it may be is a master deal-maker softening an adversary in preparation for a global chess match that might go better with an opening chapter of sweet-talk than it has of late with Obama’s empty rhetoric followed by inaction or worse.

This is a huge problem for Trump. Obama and Clinton are liberals. While they may change their views on specific issues, gay marriage for example, they will always be liberals.

3. Zero Experience Dealing with Foreign Leaders

It is true that Trump has zero experience dealing with foreign leaders. But he has a half-century of experience sizing up rivals and adversaries, using words and actions to lure them toward his agenda.

4. He traffics in Conspiracy Theories

“He traffics in conspiracy theories.” This wholly accurate Trump criticism holds water, but dings him far less than those wielding it might wish.

His flirtations with such matters has ranged from the goofy (Rafael Cruz and Lee Harvey Oswald) to the inexcusable (Bush lied about WMDs to get us into war). But these moments seem to flit by without consequence, and the most recent one, the flight of Vince Foster nostalgia, was actually defused by the hyperventilations of overreaction.

As the voices of punditry gasped at his doubts on the official Foster story, millions old enough to remember 1993 thought: “Hmmm. The Clintons. The scandals. The various pressures of covering for them. Foster’s repeated frustrations with the Washington whirlwind. The decades of envelope-pushing by Bill and Hillary ever since. Know what? Maybe I’m not so sure what happened either.”

5. He is only Doing This for His Own Ego

Davis writes:

And finally, “He is only doing this for his own ego.” No doubt, the man has a stratospheric self-image, and doesn’t mind telling us so. But this has been a trait of his for the decades we have known him. Does he engage in business deals for his own image or because he wants them to succeed? Has he plunged into various ventures from the USFL to the Miss America pageant for his own image or because he wanted them to succeed?

He clearly wishes to succeed at everything he does, so why would this not extend to running the country? This does not mean I will necessarily agree with his every instinct, but if he genuinely pursues the things he talks about with determination and seriousness, there will be far more positive results than negative.

In the end, I’d rather have a president interested in actually doing things that will make him look good, than the last seven and a half years of a president who does whatever he wants because he thinks he is already omniscient and omnipotent.

And if, at the end of his presidency, the country will have been truly benefited, Trump will enjoy the enormous benefit of an even loftier list of achievements, and we might enjoy the benefit of an America made, at least in some ways, great again.

7 Important Communication Skills to Get and Keep a Great Job

Communication is a requirement for almost any job and almost any life activity.

Here are the top 7 communication skills that will help you succeed in work and life.

1. Understand The Intent of the Communication
We all begin communication with an intent to achieve some purpose. The Intent of what you want to achieve is the most important thing to focus on when you communicate. And you should also think about the intent of the person and/or group participating in the communication.  The more both sender and receiver agree on the Intent of the communication the more likely the outcome of the communication will be successful.

2. Listening
#1 above is the Intent of the communication. In order to achieve your intent you have to listen to the other person. You have to listen to the community. You have to listen to the Experts. You have to know if they understand your intent.

I recommend practicing active listening. Active listening involves paying close attention to what the other person is saying, asking clarifying questions, and rephrasing what the person says to ensure understanding (“So, what you’re saying is…”). Through active listening, you can better understand what the other person is trying to say, and can respond appropriately.

3. Constructing the Right Message and the right channel to Achieve your Intent
Once you know the Intent of your communication you need to construct the message and pick the best channel to achieve your intent. For example, some serious conversations (layoffs, changes in salary, etc.) are almost always best done in person. You should also think about the person with whom you wish to speak – if they are very busy people (such as your boss, perhaps), you might want to convey your message through email. People will appreciate your thoughtful means of communication, and will be more likely to respond positively to you.

4. Short and to the Point
I use the “2” sentences and shup-up strategy.  Here is the strategy I use:

  1. I figure out my intent.
  2. I construct the best message and pick the best channel to achieve my intent.
  3. I make my point in as few sentences as possible and then shut up and listen.

The fundamental key to effective communication is to state your intent in as few words as possible. Think of communication like a faucet or fire hose with “Data” as the water.  It is important to meter the flow of information to the context.  And it is ALWAYS better to use the least about of water to achieve the goal.

Say what you want clearly and directly, whether you’re speaking to someone in person, on the phone, or via email. If you ramble on, your listener will either tune you out or will be unsure of exactly what you want. Think about what you want to say before you say it; this will help you to avoid talking excessively and/or confusing your audience.

  • Verbal Communication Skills

5. Nonverbal Communication
Your body language, eye contact, hand gestures, and tone all color the message you are trying to convey. A relaxed, open stance (arms open, legs relaxed), and a friendly tone will make you appear approachable, and will encourage others to speak openly with you. Eye contact is also important; you want to look the person in the eye to demonstrate that you are focused on the person and the conversation (however, be sure not to stare at the person, which can make him or her uncomfortable).
Also pay attention to other people’s nonverbal signals while you are talking. Often, nonverbal signals convey how a person is really feeling. For example, if the person is not looking you in the eye, he or she might be uncomfortable or hiding the truth.

  • Nonverbal Communication Skills

6. Feedback
Giving and looking for feedback is critical to communication success. Managers and supervisors should continuously look for ways to provide employees with constructive feedback, be it through email, phone calls, or weekly status updates. Giving feedback involves giving praise as well – something as simple as saying “good job” to an employee can greatly increase motivation.

Similarly, you should be able to accept, and even encourage, feedback from others. Listen to the feedback you are given, ask clarifying questions if you are unsure of the issue, and make efforts to implement the feedback.

7. Be “More Attractive” not “Less Repulsive”
My father used to say that “you catch more flies with honey, than vinegar.”  Essentially the moral is: on average its better to be “Attractive” then “Repulsive.”  That is particularly true about communication.

Communication is about information.  And the more information you have the better the communication.  You will receive more information if you are open and attractive than if you are closed and/or repulsive.  So as a general rule, since we want as much information as we can get, it is better to be open and attractive.  The question I would have is why would anyone think being closed are repulsive be better for communication?

There are specific traits the enhance attractiveness:

  1. Friendliness: Through a friendly tone, a personal question, or simply a smile, you will encourage your coworkers to engage in open and honest communication with you. This is important in both face-to-face and written communication. When you can, personalize your emails to coworkers and/or employees – a quick “I hope you all had a good weekend” at the start of an email can personalize a message and make the recipient feel more appreciated.
  2. Empathy: – Even when you disagree with an employer, coworker, or employee, it is important for you to understand and respect their point of view. Using phrases as simple as “I understand where you are coming from” (And of course actually understanding where they are coming from) demonstrate that you have been listening to the other person and respect their opinions.
  3. Open-Mindedness: – A good communicator should enter any conversation with a flexible, open mind. Be open to listening to and understanding the other person’s point of view, rather than simply getting your message across. By being willing to enter into a dialogue, even with people with whom you disagree, you will be able to have more honest, productive conversations.
  4. Respect: – People will be more open to communicating with you if you convey respect for them and their ideas. Simple actions like using a person’s name, making eye contact, and actively listening when a person speaks will make the person feel appreciated. On the phone, avoid distractions and stay focused on the conversation.Convey respect through email by taking the time to edit your message. If you send a sloppily written, confusing email, the recipient will think you do not respect her enough to think through your communication with her.

Models of Communication

In order to understand how all this fits together I offer the following.

Standard Model (Based on Shannon Weaver Model)


Communication as a Process


Putting the Standard Communication Model into a Process Flow.

 

What is Wrong with the GOP “Pro-Growth Agenda.”

On February 4, 2016 House Republican leaders announced the formation of six committee-led task forces charged with developing a bold, pro-growth agenda. (For updates, visit speaker.gov/confidentamerica.)

In and of itself, putting forth a pro-growth agenda is a great thing.  Congress should always be working on a pro-growth agenda.  But, the question becomes is this the right pro-growth agenda for the 6th District.

Supposedly, President Obama hasn’t done anything to save Americas economy. It’s like the past seven years never happened for Republicans. And House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) says he has a “bold, pro-growth agenda” for 2016. In his weekly address Saturday, Ryan laid out the “mission statement” of that agenda:

“We want to save the American Idea for the vast majority of Americans who believe it’s just not there for them anymore. We want America to lead again. We want America to be confident again. That is our mission.

“By giving the people a clear choice in 2016, we will seek a mandate to do big things in 2017 and beyond.”

Watch Courtesy of Speaker Ryan’s Press Office:

Here is their plan.

These discussions will focus on five areas.

First, national security. How do we go about building a 21st-century military? What do we need to do to make sure we’re equipped to defeat ISIS and the threat posed by radical Islamic terror? How do we make sure we are secure here at home?

Next, jobs and economic growth. Our economy is far from its potential. Wages are still stagnant. Families are suffering. How do we fix our tax code? How do we rein in our regulatory state? How do we maximize our energy potential?

Third, health care. Obamacare has driven up premiums, limited choices, and taken away access. These are not the signs of success – they’re the signs of failure. If and when we repeal Obamacare, what solutions will lead to lower costs and a truly patient-centered health care system?

Fourth, poverty and opportunity. There are 46 million Americans living in poverty today, and a big part of the reason is we have a safety net that catches people falling into poverty. How do we lift people up, bring them back into the workforce, and restore upward mobility?

The last piece of this agenda – and it’s so critical to all the others – is restoring the Constitution. The president’s executive overreach has undermined the Constitution and damaged the people’s trust. What needs to be done to restore the separation of powers and protect our constitutional liberties?

I disagree that this is the best “pro-growth” agenda.

First, while national security is important, it should not be first on the list. Unless it is assumed the way to grow the country is to grow the military-industrial complex.  This is where we might need some more discussion.  But, assuming that one believes that by growing the military-industrial complex we grow the economy, is the GOP saying the way to grow the economy is for the government to spend more money?  That seems a lot like Keynesian of them.  And since I don’t think they follow Keynesian economics, I suspect they are thinking something different here.

I am in favor of national security.  As I am in favor of financial security and personal security.  And I want to defeat ISIS and all religious fundamentalists that want to force their ancient world view on others.  But, to make sure we are “secure here at home” as they say, we need to also focus on right wing Nationalist that threaten our security here at home.  We also need to talk about how to keep guns out of the hands of Islamic, and White Nationalists hands in order to be more secure here at home.

Second, I agree our economy is far from its potential.  I agree that wages are stagnant and families are suffering.  But, I don’t agree that taxes and our “regulatory State” is most to blame, if at all.  I think the reason wages are stagnant is that Globalization and improved manufacturing and transportation technologies are driving wages down  It is now cheaper to ship a widget from Vietnam to Los Angeles than to ship from Detroit to Los Angeles.  And since a worker in Vietnam makes an average of under $200 dollars a month there is no reason for a US Company to pay their workers more.

Unfortunately, there is no easy answer to this problem.  So, while I am happy to have this on the agenda for growth, let’s not fool ourselves that simply reducing taxes and eliminating regulations will have the effect we all want – Higher wages.

Third, I agree that health care belongs on this list.  And I would like to see changes made to Obamacare.  But, I don’t want the requirement for “pre-existing” conditions to go away.  And I don’t believe simply saying we should go to a “truly patient-centered health care system” without full transparency to the outcomes of the service providers with result in a better health care delivery system.  My personal belief is we need to go to a “Kaiser” model.

Fourth, the statement that the way to solve poverty is to eliminate the safety net is ludicrous on its face.  Unless I’m wrong, poverty has been around for a long time.  If I am not mistaken, the Bible even talks about poor people.  And, how do you eliminate poverty while at the same fighting to eliminate the minimum wage.  The question I would ask is what does the GOP think is a annual salary of a full time that would eliminate poverty?  And if so, what are they doing to ensure someone that works full time achieves that wage.  As I said in #2 above, I think giving all our money to multinational corporations who ship jobs overseas and put all that money into un-taxable foreign bank accounts, is to blame? The GOP seems to assume that you’re poor its because you want to be poor. They seem to think that the best to eliminate poverty is to just give all that money to rich people and corporations, because they’ll share some of it.

Lastly, the GOP seems to think that putting the Constitution first will grow the economy.  This made me laugh.  This is the party that assumed, when they won a majority in Congress, that Obama’s re-election was inconsequential, that it was the Republican who had been given a mandate by the people, and that the president had to do precisely what they say. They are the ones who have violated the Constitution again and again to legislate religion, to stab the president in the back in the area of foreign policy. Executive overreach? How about legislative overreach?

Ryan is certainly using the right language, pretending to have learned the valuable lesson of the years he pretends never happened:

“To do that, we can’t just be an opposition party. We have to be a proposition party. If we do not like the direction the country is going in – and we do not – then we have an obligation to offer an alternative.”

The big problem with Ryan’s agenda is that as Robert Reich has demonstrated, that alternative has already been tried, and look where it got us in 2008.

Ryan closes by saying,

“We see it as our duty here in the people’s house to offer real ideas, to tackle the real issues head on. We want a confident America. Now it’s time to get to work.”

I agree we need to tackle the real issues. But, I don’t consider repealing Obamacare for the seventieth time without a clear plan to 1) cover pre-existing conditions and 2) prevent families from bankrupt in order to save a family member as the best way to grow America.

Pay Attention 6th District. Just because they say they’re going to fix things does not mean that it will actually fix things.

 

Top Ten IT Jobs! And How to Learn the Skills to do them!

  • No. 10: Software Architect (Senior Software Engineer) – Median Base Salary: $130,000
    • Skills
      • Communication
        • Interpersonal
        • Writing
          • Write Design Specifications and Technical Requirements
        • Team
          • Provide Code Reviews to the Team and Management
        • Presentation
      • Telecommunication
        • Network
      • Design and Programming Skills
        • Java and Java EE EJB 3/Spring, JSPs, Servlets, HTML, CSS, JQUERY, JavaScript, JDBC, C++ in a UNIX, XML, SQL
        • Agile Processes
        • Develop test cases, test plans, and expected results.
      • Marketing
      • Economics
      • Physics
      • Project Management
  • No. 9: UX Designer (User Interface) – Median Base Salary: $91,800
    • Skills
      • CommunicationWorking with business teams (across multiple partners) to determine UX needs and creating designs that meet them. As a UX Design Manager, you’ll be assessing the programs, business needs and market landscape, and owning the creative oversight required to distill these into design requirements
        Translating concepts and ideas into wireframes, workflow diagrams, customer journey maps and visual designs
        Effectively communicating, championing and defending user experience and design directions to business teams & executives using prototypes, visual communications, and narrative vision
        Leading user research, testing, and focus groups for strategic programs
        Championing user experience and design best practices to stakeholders throughout the Verizon Wireless organization. Bring design thinking to projects and act as a voice of UX innovation throughout the product development process.
        Being passionate about digital & mobile products and technology. The right person for this job lives and breathes digital & mobile experiences and has an amazing grasp on market trends and a vision for how these new products and technology designs will transform Big Data solutions 2-5 years into the future.
        Qualifications
        Bachelor’s degree or eqivalent in Human-Computer Interaction, Interaction Design, Information Design, Visual Design or related field; accelerated degree preferred
        Experience as a UI Designer, Interaction Designer, Creative Director, Lead UX Strategist or similar
        A portfolio that demonstrates superior creative thinking and problem solving skills
        Understanding of the agency process, design process, and project management for design engagements
        Experience working across cross-functional teams (including UX and technical development/engineering, product management, marketing, executive management), with working knowledge of software development, product design, usability engineering, and quality assurance
        Attention to detail and craftsmanship
        Proven success driving programs in a matrixed environment
        Exceptional communication & presentation skills, including involvement with executive-level communications
        Excellent organization skills with proven ability to manage multiple concurrent projects and to adjust to frequent changes and project priorities.
        Ability to make a strong first impression, active listening skills, the ability to win respect and influence others, politically savvy
        Desired Skills/Experience:
        Experience in a product design or creative/strategy role within a large corporate environment
        Experience designing next-generation software/hardware platforms (TV, tablets, touch-screen, wearables and other consumer electronics.)
        Experience managing and/or collaborating with creative talent and creative agencies
        Experience with rapid prototyping in an Agile/Scrum environment.
        Prior Big Data Platform or Advertising Platform interaction or design experience preferred.
  • No. 8: QA Manager
    • Median Base Salary: $85,000
    • monitor the overall software testing process and make sure new products work before being released to the public.
  • No. 7: Software Development Manager
    • Median Base Salary: $135,000
    • This is a managerial position, which garners a higher pay grade.
    • the job requires a high degree of education, deep technical skills and several years of software experience.
  • No. 6: Analytics Manager
    • Median Base Salary: $105,000
    • Similar to the demand for data scientists, analytic managers are crucial to companies that require someone to analyze and make conclusions (about the) data.
  • No. 5: Software Engineer
    • Median Base Salary: $95,000
    • Write Code
  • No. 4: Project Manager
    • Median Base Salary: $106,680
    • this job title has cracked the top 10 both years demonstrates it continues to be one of the hottest jobs on the market.
  • No. 3: Mobile Developer
    • Median Base Salary: $90,000
    • Companies across all industries all have mobile apps — or plans to create one — and they are hiring plenty of mobile developers to create and support them, Dobroski said. Despite this trend, he added it is not surprising that the number of job openings for mobile developers is not higher. Mobile developer ranked in the top three for tech jobs on Glassdoor’s list, but overall it was No. 5 for best jobs.
  • No. 2: Solutions Architect
    • Median Base Salary: $119,500
    • The job title may be a mystery to some job seekers, but a solutions architect is an integral position in a company that handles business decisions related to software creation and performance, Dobroski said, adding, a solutions architect is a problem solver, and has a mix of both business and technical skills. Solutions architects often work closely with clients to hear feedback on their company’s product, and then provide any solutions needed based on the feedback.
    • Solutions architects also ranked No. 3 among the best jobs in all categories, as well, on the overall Glassdoor list. “It’s a top job because of the high number of job openings, the hefty average salary and plenty of career opportunities,” said Dobroski.
  • No. 1: Data Scientist
    • Median Base Salary: $116,840
    • Data scientist has ruled as one of the hottest jobs for years, coming in at No. 9 on Glassdoor’s 25 Best Jobs in America list last year, Dobroski said. He pointed to the high demand for these types of jobs, as well as high salaries and great career opportunities, as contributing to the top rating on Glassdoor’s list.
    • Not only did data scientists capture the No. 1 slot among tech jobs, but it also held the same rank for all jobs. “It isn’t a big surprise to see data scientist at No. 1 this year because it’s one of the hottest and fastest growing jobs we’re seeing right now,” said Andrew Chamberlain, Glassdoor chief economist. “Since all companies have an online presence these days, they all need people who know how to manage and store data that helps them make better business decisions, compared to years ago when businesses didn’t have data management at their fingertips to review and analyze to help them drive business forward. I expect this to continue to be a hot job for several years to come, too.”